Legs Up the Wall or on the Ball Yoga Pose for Swollen Feet

Ahhh,

I distinctly remember the conversation I had with a YogaFit master trainer, in that she was also an airline steward(ress), and that she used the Legs up the Wall, or Legs on the Ball Yoga Pose to help her swollen feet, and her tendencies to have varicose veins.

After having seatmates on the plane, and flying at night, for a 13 hour flight, it was not easy to get up and walk around the plane, on the way back. Mind you we had lots of turbulance too. (Seat belt sign ON!) So needless to say, my legs/ankles/feet were a might swollen. I’ve never had this sensation before-yup…never had swollen feet during pregnancy (it was the yoga!) neither. So this was a new experience for me.

So it took a bit of searching for me to remember about the ease of the Legs up the wall yoga pose. Again, Ahhh. Did a bit of ankle circles, heel flexing and toe pointing too.

Now if I could get back on my own time schedule, instead of 13 hours ahead I’d be good. So I’ll go to bed in a bit!

What do you do for your swollen legs/feet/ankles?

Gaileee

Yoga in Korea ICN airport.

I’m walking by the lounge in the Korea (ICN) airport with a 7 hour layover, and there is an advertisement for a yoga session. Hmmmm, need to see what that is all about!

Taught a prenatal yoga class in Mongolia, where the custom is that you do not get down on the floor in a public setting. Had to really change up what I was going to teach. Good thing I created two lesson plans, and one of them was to do poses in the chair for prenatal yoga!

Also taught a private yoga lesson for Amber’s Chamber of Commerce director in Avraikheer. The emphasis on poses for back issues.

Additionally, showed Patrick and the director, the YogaFit Flying Bird vinyasa, and one of my favorites, the YogaFit Twisted Chair vinyasa (or maybe that is my vinyasa, but I’m just presenting the poses in the traditional YogaFit format). Definately got their (and mine) heart rate up, just with those vinyasas and a few Salute to the Suns.

gaileee
p.s. See you soon in the states!
p.s.s. I guess I’m an international yoga teacher now.

What do the Peace Corps and Mongolia have in common?

What do the Peace Corps and Mongolia have in common? Well, that would be Amber Barger of course! Amber is graduating at UT this May with a BBA in Marketing, and taking an Business Advisor assignment with the Peace Corps to go to Mongolia.

Mongolia is the shape of a long oval, about 1500 miles from east to west and 780 miles from north to south at the widest point. It is roughly the size of North and South Dakota, Wyoming, Colorado, Montana, Kansas and Nebraska combined. Population of about 2 million, which is about slightly less than 3 people per square mile.

Mongolia is a mysterious place, sealed off from the rest of the world by the forbidding wastelands of central Asia – cliffs, arid plateaus, deserts a,d vast uninhabited tracts. The famous Italian trader and explorer Marco Polo reached Mongolia and met Genghis Khan’s descendant, Kublia Khan. When the Chinese controlled all the Mongolia in the 18th and 19th centuries, they closed it to the outside world. As a result, little was known of modern Mongolia until the Mongolia Peoples Republic achieved independence with the help of the Soviet Union in 1921.

Since 1921, the main goal of the Mongolian government has been to bring the country into the 20th century. The rapid pace of change in Mongolia has created a country with a split personality. Many ancient customs and ways of life persist strongly, giving Mongolia an in-escapeable flavor of the past. For example, it is not unusual to see sturdy Mongol horses, whose shaggy ancestors carried Genghis Khan into battle, tethered outside high-rise apartments in the capital city of Ulan Battor.

The weather in Mongolia is akin to living in North Dakota, and northern parts of Minnesota. Amber will train during the summer months, and then be given a Peace Corps assignment.

gaileee

What do the Peace Corps and Mongolia have in common?

What do the Peace Corps and Mongolia have in common? Well, that would be Amber Barger of course! Amber is graduating at UT this May with a BBA in Marketing, and taking an Business Advisor assignment with the Peace Corps to go to Mongolia.

Mongolia is the shape of a long oval, about 1500 miles from east to west and 780 miles from north to south at the widest point. It is roughly the size of North and South Dakota, Wyoming, Colorado, Montana, Kansas and Nebraska combined. Population of about 2 million, which is about slightly less than 3 people per square mile.

Mongolia is a mysterious place, sealed off from the rest of the world by the forbidding wastelands of central Asia – cliffs, arid plateaus, deserts a,d vast uninhabited tracts. The famous Italian trader and explorer Marco Polo reached Mongolia and met Genghis Khan’s descendant, Kublia Khan. When the Chinese controlled all the Mongolia in the 18th and 19th centuries, they closed it to the outside world. As a result, little was known of modern Mongolia until the Mongolia Peoples Republic achieved independence with the help of the Soviet Union in 1921.

Since 1921, the main goal of the Mongolian government has been to brin the country into the 20th century. The rapid pace of change in Mongolia has created a country with a split personality. Many ancient customs and ways of life persist strongly, giving Mongolia an inescapeable flavor of the past. For example, it is not unusual to see sturdy Mongol horses, whose shaggy ancestors carried Genghis Khan into battle, tethered outside high-rise apartments in the capital city of Ulan Bator.

The weather in Mongolia is akin to living in North Dakota, and northern parts of Minnesota. Amber will train during the summer months, and then be given a Peace Corps assignment.

gaileee