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#BeginnersYoga #gentleyogaforlowbackcare Guided Meditation meditation Meditation Benefits

May I Be Well Metta Meditation

May I Be Well

May I Be Metta Meditation

May I be well

May I be happy and content

May I be free from danger and suffering

May I be filled with loving-kindness

May you be well

May you be happy and content

May you be free from danger and suffering

May you be filled with loving-kindness

May all beings be well

May all beings be happy and content

May all beings be free from danger and suffering

May all beings be filled with loving-kindness

May I Be Well – Metta Meditation
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Breathing Benefits Meditation Benefits Yoga Benefits

Health Benefits of Meditation…..and Breathing….

Health benefits of Meditation:

Observance is meditation
Observance is meditation

Though meditation is usually recognized as a largely spiritual practice, it also has many health benefits. The yoga and meditation techniques are being implemented in management of life threatening diseases; in transformation of molecular and genetic structure; in reversal of mental illnesses, in accelerated learning programs, in perceptions and communications beyond the physical, in solving problems and atomic and nuclear physics; in gaining better ecological understanding; in management of lifestyle and future world problems. Some benefits of meditation are:

It reduces oxygen consumption.
It decreases respiratory rate.
It increases blood flow and slows the heart rate.
Increases exercise tolerance in heart patients.
Leads to a deeper level of relaxation.
Good for people with high blood pressure as it brings the B.P. to normal.
Reduces anxiety attacks by lowering the levels of blood lactate.
Decreases muscle tension (any pain due to tension) and headaches.
Builds self-confidence.
It increases serotonin production which influences mood and behavior. Low levels of serotonin are associated with depression, obesity, insomnia and headaches.
Helps in chronic diseases like allergies , arthritis etc.
Reduces Pre – menstrual Syndrome.
Helps in post-operative healing.
Enhances the immune system. Research has revealed that meditation increases activity of ‘natural-killer cells’, which kill bacteria and cancer cells.
Also reduces activity of viruses and emotional distress.
FB Yoga Sleep Yoga Nidra
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DIY Sew Yoga Pant DIY Sewing Yoga meditation Meditation Benefits Sewing Sewing Yoga Sewing Yoga Bolsters Sewing Yoga goodies Yoga Mat Bag Sewing Tutorial Yoga Props Zafu Meditation Pillow Zafu Sewing Instructions

Additional information on making your own Yoga Props! DIY Meditation Pillows.

Additional information on making your own Yoga Props! DIY Meditation Pillows.  Sew your own yoga accessories, mat wrap, mat bag, zafu meditation pillow, yoga bolsters and more.

You know Simplicity has come out with patterns for making bolsters, cushions, yoga mat bags and such, but there is a wealth of info out there on the web to help you make your own yoga props.

Here is the list.

Here are some additional links to making your own yoga mat bag, even a cool video, and a way to make a yoga mat wrap….plus some more on zafu’s!!

figandplum

Make a Yoga Mat Bag at Fig and Plum site

Anna’s corner of the world – mjeanyogamataking a yoga mat bag from denim jeans!

Tingaling Yoga Mat Wrap 

yogamatwraptutorial

Yoga Mat Bag Tutorial, like a long tote bag.  I’m making this one

longtoteyogamatbag

Love this mat bag.  A Sling Over the Shoulder Tube Mat Bag

yogamatbag

Another one with decorative ribbons

Sling Mat Yoga Tote

Instructions no longer on some of the websites, so I’ve included the

instructions onto this page.

Make those meditation pillows (zafu’s)

 

Updated 2/2013

How to Make a Zafu and Zabuton

Posted by Som on Monday, March 13, 2006

Whether you’re looking for some comfortable, casual seating or you want to make your meditation sessions more pleasant, a zafu and zabuton are wonderful things to have around the house. Zafu and zabuton are traditional Japanese cushions used for meditation; the zafu is a circular pillow with pleated sides, and the zabuton is pretty much just a large, flat pillow. You can order them online for $40+ each, but it’s cheaper and more satisfying to make your own at home.



(I don’t have the best meditation posture, but you get the idea of how the cushions work. The zabuton is a little small for me, because this is one I made for a friend who’s shorter than I am.)

The zafu elevates and cushions the pelvis, and the zabuton cushions the knees and ankles. This position facilitates better posture, eases joint and back pain, and may help one achieve deeper longer meditation sessions. As long as you’re making one set, why not make two? Keep the extra set for guests, give it to a friend who meditates or has back problems, or donate it to your local Zen center or Buddhist temple.
About the materials: I chose to use a cotton/polyester blend for these because it’s cheap and easy to clean with a wet rag; these aren’t something you can just throw in the washing machine. When I’m more settled in my meditation practice, I’ll probably make another set out of some heavy silk, perhaps adding some colorful embroidery or sashiko stitching.

As for filler, I used organic pillow-grade buckwheat hulls for the zafu and plain ol’ polyester stuffing for the zabuton. Kapok would be a better choice for both, but it’s fairly expensive. Manna Harvest sells organic buckwheat hulls for $8.95US/5 lbs. The only US source for kapok I could find is Carolina Morning Designs, and their prices are pretty high. From what I hear about kapok, though, it’s probably worth the price.
Click below for full instructions on how to make the zafu and zabuton.
Zafu
Materials:

  • Cotton/polyester blend fabric, 2 yards (note: 2 yards is enough for two zafu)
  • Pillow-grade buckwheat hulls, 5 lbs.
  • Zipper
  • Sewing thread
  • Sewing machine
  • Hand-sewing needle, pins, scissors
  • Iron, ironing board, and water spray bottle

You can download PDF instructions for making your own zafu listed above. That’s what I started with, but I had to tweak it a little for my own use. I recommend downloading it even if you’re going to use my instructions, as the illustrations in the PDF are quite helpful.

Cut a strip of fabric 65″ x 7″ (there are a few extra inches in the length for fudging purposes.) Cut two circles 13″ in diameter – I used a 13″ round serving plate for my template, but you could also make from cardboard using a compass and a pencil.

Pleat the long strip of fabric: measure 4.5″ inches from one end and mark. Make two more marks 3/4″ from the first. Measuring from your center mark, repeat the process every 4″ until you have 14 pleats marked. Fold, iron, and pin the pleats (since the iron setting for polyester blends usually isn’t high enough for steam, use a water spray bottle for best results.)

On the end, you started pleating at, fold back the fabric 1/2″ and iron. Begin pinning the strip of fabric around one of the fabric circles. When you get to the end, you’ll have a few extra inches of fabric. Fold back and iron. Pin your zipper in place on the folded ends of the fabric, making sure to cut and secure the zipper at least 1″ away from the top and bottom of the fabric to allow room for sewing. Use the sewing machine and a zipper foot to sew the zipper in place; hand-stitch the remaining seam of the side strip width. Trim the extra fabric behind the zipper.

Using the sewing machine, stitch the side fabric strip to the first circle of fabric with a 3/8″ seam allowance. Then pin and sew to the second circle. Trim the extra thread, remove any remaining pins, and turn the pillow.
Stuff as much buckwheat hull as you can into the pillow. This is a little tricky, as buckwheat hulls are tiny and quite devious. Also, they really hurt under bare feet. Fill it as much as you can, shake it down, and fill some more. I used almost all of the 5 lbs. of buckwheat hulls I purchased. Once it’s full, try it out. You may find that you’d be more comfortable with more or less filling – hence the zipper. (And, I’ll admit, I’m terrible at blindstitching. The zipper is my way of cheating.)

If you want to make your circles a different diameter, here is how you calculate where to place your pleats and how long a strip of fabric you need: Multiply the diameter of your fabric circle by pi (3.14159.) This will give you the circumference; for a 13″ diameter, I got a 40.84″ circumference. Add 1″ for the zipper seams (=41.84″.) For 14 pleats, each 3/4″ and using 1 1/2″ of fabric, add 21″ (=62.84″.) Add a couple of inches for fudging purposes, so you’ll be sure not to run out of fabric and have to start all over again (=65″.)
To determine where to put your pleats, take the length of your fabric strip, minus the 1″ of seam allowance and 2″ or so for fudging allowance (in my case, 62″.) Divide by 15 (=4.13″.) Round off as best as you can (=4″.) Remember to add your 1/2″ seam allowance for the measurement before the first pleat (=4 1/2″.)
Zabuton
Materials:

  • Cotton/polyester blend fabric, 1 1/2 yards
  • Polyester, cotton, or kapok stuffing, ~2 lbs.
  • Sewing thread, machine, etc.

Cut two rectangles of fabric, 32 1/2″ x 27 1/2″ (if you’re over 6′ tall, add a few inches to both dimensions. You need it to be big enough to accommodate you when sitting crosslegged with your knees comfortably cushioned on the zabuton.) Note: Cutting a straight line that long can be difficult. In order to make sure that my cuts are indeed straight, and that I end up with 90o angles, I use the pulled thread method for cutting straight lines in the fabric.

Pin the rectangles together and stitch around the edges with a 3/8″ seam allowance, leaving an opening about 4″ wide on one side for turning and stuffing. Make sure to backstitch at the corners and on both sides of the opening. If you like, you can stitch a small curve on the edges or add a rise, but it’s not necessary.
Turn and stuff. A word about polyester stuffing: it’s tempting to just grab wads of stuffing and jam it in there without a care in the world, but you’ll end up with a lumpy, unusable pillow. Take the time to do it right. Grab a handful of stuffing and pinch off little pieces. You can make a big pile of pinched stuffing and then stuff the pillow by the handful. You’ll use a lot less stuffing this way, and your zabuton will be nice and fluffy – not lumpy.

Once the zabuton is stuffed to your liking (I stuffed to about a 2″ rise,) stitch the opening shut. To keep the stuffing from shifting about too much, tuft the zabuton. I added four tufts, each about 8″ from the corners toward the center of the pillow. To tuft, take a sewing needle and an 18″ length of thread. Double your thread and pierce both layers of the pillow; pull the needle through, but leave a few inches of thread on top. Bring the needle back through both layers of pillow near the first stitch. Pull both ends of the thread tight and tie it off carefully. Clip the extra thread.

…and you’re done!
Yoga with Gail

Other links for sewing up your yoga props

Yoga Props

Yoga Props II

Yoga Props III

 

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Beginners Yoga with Gail Pickens-Barger Benefits of a Regular Yoga Practice Benefits of a Yoga Practice Benefits of Yoga Eating Meditation Meditation Benefits Mindfull Eating Relaxation, iRest, Yoga Nidra, Yogic Sleep Yoga Benefits Yoga Nidra

Why Eating Meditations are the best things since sliced bread.

Why Eating Meditations are the best things since sliced bread.

Lex Gillan and The Yoga Institute in Houston – one of the oldest and most respected studio businesses in the country – have been helping others share the dharma for 45 years. Lex has taught this course more than 200 times certifying more than 3,000 teachers. The Yoga Teacher Training and National Certification Courses are registered with The National Association of Certified Yoga Teachers and Yoga Alliance for both 200-hour and 500-hour programs. These are turnkey courses that can help turn your passion for yoga into right livelihood through full- or part-time teaching.”

Lex has shared with his yoga students, that he was once 285 pounds.  He used the Eating Meditation to help him initially lose 70 pounds.  Then after taking a break, he eventually lost an additional 65 pounds.  He really, really wanted to lose weight.  Here is a little snippet of the eating meditation that he recently shared up on facebook.

Mindful eating practice to lose weight.
Mindful eating practice to lose weight.

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#adaptiveyoga #BeginnersYoga #chairyogafitness Beginners Yoga with Gail Pickens-Barger Meditation Benefits Monday Yoga at 6:15pm at Wesley UMC Nederland Texas Nederland and Beaumont Yoga Texas Prenatal Yoga in chairs Private Yoga Lessons Beaumont Texas Private Yoga Lessons Nederland Texas Seated Cardio Seated Chair Fitness Seated Fitness Seated Yoga Veterans Yoga Veterans Yoga Project Yoga for Beginners Yoga for Better Sleep Yoga for Stress Reduction

God Bless America

God Bless America

VYP pt1
God Bless America

#veteransyogaproject
#beginnersyoga
#chairyogafitness