Yoga Gear & Props Sewing Patterns – Pinterest Site

Yoga Gear & Props Sewing Patterns – Pinterest Site

http://pinterest.com/yogakiddos/yoga-sewing-patterns/

 

Getting a bit back into sewing these days.  Need to get out the serger and cover stitch machine!  Woo!

Props and Gear for your Yoga practice – sew them up!

Props and Gear for your Yoga practice – sew them up!

Sew if you have any sewing ability, you can make these items for your Yoga practice.

  • yogamatbagA Yoga Bag by Amy Butler  – Yoga Mat Bag 

  • A Lavender Eye Pillow by Amy Butler – Lavender Eye Peyepillowillow

  • A cool headband, to keep that hair out of the way …. at Headband for the hair!

diyheadbandcollection

Head Scarf 1 

Head Scarf 2

Head Scarf 3 

Head Scarf 4

Head Scarf 5

zafu1

Part I on Zafu Instructions

zafu3

Part II

zafu2

Zafu III

.

zafu4

Last Zafu instruction

  • Make your own bolsters. Now I found an article in one of my sewing books,
    “Sewing for the Outdoors”, but then I found this on the internet… the same concept.
    I used a roll of quilt batting, figured out how circle part on the bottom….well, kinda like the instructions for the yoga mat. Here are some links.

 

Stuff Sack Instruction #1

I used some cotton material that I had around the house. I used this same concept, to cover a neck roll that I had so that I could also use this in restorative yoga poses.

Here’s another link for making a stuff sack, or a cover for your cylinder shaped bolster…

stuffsack_step14

Stuff Sack Instructions #2

and lastly here is another link for making the “stuffed bolster sack…”

Stuff Sack Instructions #3

Enjoy making your own yoga props!

Gail Pickens-Barger, International and Experience Certified and Registered Yoga Teacher

Props and Gear for your Yoga practice . . .

Props and Gear for your Yoga practice.

Yoga with Gaileee Zafu Meditation Cushion

Yoga with Gail –  Star Meditation Cushion

Sew if you have any sewing ability, you can make these items for your Yoga practice.

Seiza

How to make a Seiza

Seiza1

First, what is a seiza? It is a bench to sit on during kneeling meditation.

Sitting_Seiza

Do I need one? Nope.

WHAT YOU NEED

  • A sheet of wood, ¾-inch (2 cm) thick, and approximately 20 by 20 inches (52 cm). Alternatively, you might use scraps of wood of various sizes, according to the actual sections required.
  • At least ten 1¼-inch (3 cm) countersink woodscrews
  • A hand saw for wood (a cross-cut hand saw, if available, or possibly an electric table saw/rip saw)
  • A drill (or powerdrill), a small drill bit for wood, and a countersink bit or a countersink tool
  • Wood glue
  • Two or more C-clamps
  • Sandpaper (and perhaps a disc-sander)

CHOOSING THE WOOD

Any strong, solid wood used for furniture will work. Be sure the wood doesn’t bend easily (you’ll be sitting on this), and that it wont split when screws are put into the narrow sides.

A solid, single piece of wood like pine or cedar will probably look better and be easier to work with — especially if you plan to varnish or stain the wood later. Avoid standard plywood and chipboard, which will probably bend, flake or disintegrate. Make sure your wood is flat and not warped. Solid scraps of wood that match the sizes needed could work fine as well; your seiza doesn’t need to be fancy, just functional.

CUTTING THE LENGTHS

You need to cut five pieces of wood, like this:

seiza2

MAKING THE LEGS

Ensuring symmetry

After cutting, the parts may be a little rough — one leg may not exactly match the other. Even wood bought from a shop may not have edges that are exactly straight.

To fix this, simply clamp the legs together and sand the edges until they all match. If you can, get a few of the sides to line up before starting; it will provide a good reference point. Try to clamp the sides together in an ‘average’ position, to minimize how much sanding is needed. Don’t worry about detail sanding right now, such as rounding corners for aesthetic purposes. Right now you just want things to line up.

Before long, you should have two identical legs.

THE FIRST LEG

Attach the reinforcement to the inside edge of the leg, in the center of the slanted edge. Like this:
Seiza3

Line up the edges of the two pieces as best you can. Measure the distance to both edges, so that the little piece is in the middle of the leg’s edge. Clamp the two pieces together using C-clamps. Place one at each side, along the flat edges (not the slanted edge) of the leg, so that they’re not in the way of your work. You need to small drill holes in the pieces. The holes shown here are bigger, for clarity.

Seiza4

Using a drill, bore two pilot holes for screws into both pieces of wood. Pilot holes guide the screws and prevent the wood from splitting. Use a drill bit around half the diameter of the woodscrews, or a little smaller. If the diameter is too large, the woodscrews won’t get a strong grip and the seiza could break easily.

After drilling the pilot holes, you to countersink them. Countersink screws have a triangular head with a flat top, designed to sit flush with the surface of the wood. Countersinking makes a similar triangular shape into the top of the pilot hole, to allow the woodscrew to be flush to the surface:

Seiza5

Once the pilot holes are drilled and countersinking is done, join the pieces together. Release the C-clamps, add a little glue between the pieces, re-clamp, and screw the pieces together. Be careful to put the screws in from the outside — from the larger leg, into the smaller reinforcement:

Make sure the screws are tight, wipe off any excess glue, and leave it to dry for a few minutes.

THE SECOND LEG

Be careful which side you attach the reinforcement to on the second leg. It needs to be the opposite of the first. Take the first piece, and place it with the slant coming down from the back to the front. Whichever side the reinforcement is on will be the inside. Take the other leg, and place it further over, across the inside edge, and then place the second reinforcement on the new leg’s inside edge:

Seiza6

Line up the pieces, clamp them together, drill and countersink the pilot holes, unclamp, glue, clamp again, and finally screw the pieces together. Remember to drill the holes and put the screws in from the outside edge, opposite the reinforcement, and when finished, allow some time for the glue to set before removing the clamps.

COMPLETING THE LEGS

When the legs are assembled, sand off the top slanted edge to make sure that the reinforcement and the leg edge are even. The seat should be flat against the legs to best distribute your weight evenly.

THE SEAT

Place the seat on top of the two legs, making sure the reinforcements are on the inside edge. Line everything up, so that the edges of the seat are tight against the edges of the legs.

You could move the legs in slightly to allow the seat to overhang the legs, creating a more interesting shape. This could make it more difficult to line up the seat screws, and you need to have enough space for your legs underneath the bench.

Clamp your seat down by placing the C-clamps around the seat and the reinforcement bars. If you have a limited number of clamps, place them diagonally opposite around the seat. Even two clamps will do, but four would be ideal.

Drill and countersink three pilot holes in each side of the seat. Two should go through the seat into each leg, and the other should be further in, so that it goes into the reinforcement. Measure all the distances carefully, so that the screws are centered and symmetrical on each side. Something like this:

Seiza7

It’s particularly important to countersink the holes properly, since they’re on the seat that you’re going to sit on. If they’re not deep enough, the screws will sit up and be rough. Once the holes are drilled, release the clamps and apply glue to the top of the legs. Re-clamp, and screw down. Leave the clamps for a while so the glue can dry.

Once the glue dries, you’re done!

Finishing

Finally, check once more that it sits well. Hopefully, you won’t have any major problems with one leg an inch lower than the other. If you notice a little rocking, it should be easy to fix by sanding the bottom surfaces to be even.

You can cover the screw holes completely with a product called ‘plastic wood.’ Or try just mixing some wood glue with sawdust you made earlier, place it into the recessed screw hole, and sanding it down when dry.

You have a few finishing options. You can stain it to match your other furniture, or make it look like a more interesting kind of wood perhaps — or you can varnish it to give it a professional, glossy finish that’s easy to clean.

A smooth well-sanded surface is important. You don’t want to sit on, or even carry a seat that’s rough. Splinters aren’t much fun! If you are planning to use a varnish, sanding will be an important first step. Sanding by hand is pretty simple — just keep going in a circular pattern, with very light pressure, until things feel smooth. Pay particular attention to corners and edges. It’s nice to get those smoothly curved — especially at the front where your legs will leave the seat.

Suggestions

The folks at the WildMind website suggest that seiza benches require more hand support than other meditation methods. You may want to use an extra pillow to support your hands more fully above your waist as you kneel. WildMind has lots of great guidance on posture, though — I’d suggest referring to that site, if you’re having difficulties.

About this guide

http://www.michiganbuddhist.com/seiza – original site

  • And make your own bolsters. Now I found an article in one of my sewing books, “Sewing for the Outdoors”, but then I found this on the internet… the same concept. I used a roll of quilt batting, figured out how circle part on the bottom….well, kinda like the instructions for the yoga mat. Here’s a link…

I used some cotton material that I had around the house. I used this same concept, to cover a neck roll that I had so that I could also use this in restorative yoga poses.

Here’s another link for making a stuff sack, or a cover for your cylinder shaped bolster…

p.s.s. Update,Simplicity 3583 and McCalls 4261. Get them when they are on sale at Hobby Lobby or JoAnn’s Fabric Store, or Hancocks.

Yoga Clothing, Gear and Prop Sewing Patterns

 

Yoga Clothing, Gear and Prop Sewing Patterns

Great Yoga Mat Bag Tutorial.  It is like a large long tote bag!

You can catch these patterns on sale from various places, JoAnns, Hancocks, Hobby Lobby. Sign up for the newsletters, or read the weekly ads online.

So here are the Yoga Clothing/Props patterns that I have…there may be more…


McCall’s MP260 or M4606- including yoga mat bag & Blanket. Two tops, two length jackets, and yoga pant. Still for sale on Ebay.

McCall’s M5664 – Halter Yoga Top, Cap, Sleeveless Shell, Yoga Jacket, Crop and Long Yoga Pant. On McCall’s website, out of print, but you probably can find it in the stores still.

McCall’s 4261 – Sports Bra Top, Long Sleeved Top, Long Skirt (?), Mat Bag, Crop and Long Yoga Pant and Yoga Jacket. (Girl standing in Tree pose.)

Simplicity 3583 – Yoga Accessories: Strap, Eyebag, Mat Bag, Meditation pillow, Zafu, Neck/knee roll and Bolster.

Kwik Sew – Known for a lot of dancer type clothing, and now Yoga/Pilates patterns.

Kwik Sew 3497 – Variations on yoga tops.

Kwik Sew 3498 – “Girls” yoga pants!

Kwik Sew 3115 – Spaghetti Strap Yoga Top, Shell Top, Capri, and Long Yoga Pant.

Kwik Sew 2723 – Racer Back Yoga Top, Boy Shorts, Runners Shorts and Jazzy Yoga Pants.

Kwik Sew 2632 – Long-Sleeved Tied Top (dancer inspired), Leotard & Long Jazzy Yoga Pant.

Kwik Sew 2722 – Unitard with either spaghetti straps or keyhole back. Short or Pant Length.

Oh, yeah, the only thing I’ve made is a large and small bolster, yoga mat bag, eye pillow, blanket and lots of zafu’s!!!

Additional information on making your own Yoga Props! DIY Meditation Pillows.

Additional information on making your own Yoga Props! DIY Meditation Pillows.  Sew your own yoga accessories, mat wrap, mat bag, zafu meditation pillow, yoga bolsters and more.

You know Simplicity has come out with patterns for making bolsters, cushions, yoga mat bags and such, but there is a wealth of info out there on the web to help you make your own yoga props.

Here is the list.

Here are some additional links to making your own yoga mat bag, even a cool video, and a way to make a yoga mat wrap….plus some more on zafu’s!!

Make a Yoga Mat Bag at Fig and Plum site

Anna’s corner of the world – making a yoga mat bag from denim jeans!

Tingaling Yoga Mat Wrap

Yoga Mat Bag Tutorial, like a long tote bag.  I’m making this one

longtoteyogamatbag

Love this mat bag.  A Sling Over the Shoulder Tube Mat Bag

yogamatbag

Another one with decorative ribbons

Sling Mat Yoga Tote

Instructions no longer on some of the websites, so I’ve included the

instructions onto this page.

Make those meditation pillows (zafu’s)

 

Updated 2/2013

How to Make a Zafu and Zabuton

Posted by Som on Monday, March 13, 2006

Whether you’re looking for some comfortable, casual seating or you want to make your meditation sessions more pleasant, a zafu and zabuton are wonderful things to have around the house. Zafu and zabuton are traditional Japanese cushions used for meditation; the zafu is a circular pillow with pleated sides, and the zabuton is pretty much just a large, flat pillow. You can order them online for $40+ each, but it’s cheaper and more satisfying to make your own at home.



(I don’t have the best meditation posture, but you get the idea of how the cushions work. The zabuton is a little small for me, because this is one I made for a friend who’s shorter than I am.)

The zafu elevates and cushions the pelvis, and the zabuton cushions the knees and ankles. This position facilitates better posture, eases joint and back pain, and may help one achieve deeper longer meditation sessions. As long as you’re making one set, why not make two? Keep the extra set for guests, give it to a friend who meditates or has back problems, or donate it to your local Zen center or Buddhist temple.
About the materials: I chose to use a cotton/polyester blend for these because it’s cheap and easy to clean with a wet rag; these aren’t something you can just throw in the washing machine. When I’m more settled in my meditation practice, I’ll probably make another set out of some heavy silk, perhaps adding some colorful embroidery or sashiko stitching.

As for filler, I used organic pillow-grade buckwheat hulls for the zafu and plain ol’ polyester stuffing for the zabuton. Kapok would be a better choice for both, but it’s fairly expensive. Manna Harvest sells organic buckwheat hulls for $8.95US/5 lbs. The only US source for kapok I could find is Carolina Morning Designs, and their prices are pretty high. From what I hear about kapok, though, it’s probably worth the price.
Click below for full instructions on how to make the zafu and zabuton.
Zafu
Materials:

  • Cotton/polyester blend fabric, 2 yards (note: 2 yards is enough for two zafu)
  • Pillow-grade buckwheat hulls, 5 lbs.
  • Zipper
  • Sewing thread
  • Sewing machine
  • Hand-sewing needle, pins, scissors
  • Iron, ironing board, and water spray bottle

You can download PDF instructions for making your own zafu listed above. That’s what I started with, but I had to tweak it a little for my own use. I recommend downloading it even if you’re going to use my instructions, as the illustrations in the PDF are quite helpful.

Cut a strip of fabric 65″ x 7″ (there are a few extra inches in the length for fudging purposes.) Cut two circles 13″ in diameter – I used a 13″ round serving plate for my template, but you could also make from cardboard using a compass and a pencil.

Pleat the long strip of fabric: measure 4.5″ inches from one end and mark. Make two more marks 3/4″ from the first. Measuring from your center mark, repeat the process every 4″ until you have 14 pleats marked. Fold, iron, and pin the pleats (since the iron setting for polyester blends usually isn’t high enough for steam, use a water spray bottle for best results.)

On the end, you started pleating at, fold back the fabric 1/2″ and iron. Begin pinning the strip of fabric around one of the fabric circles. When you get to the end, you’ll have a few extra inches of fabric. Fold back and iron. Pin your zipper in place on the folded ends of the fabric, making sure to cut and secure the zipper at least 1″ away from the top and bottom of the fabric to allow room for sewing. Use the sewing machine and a zipper foot to sew the zipper in place; hand-stitch the remaining seam of the side strip width. Trim the extra fabric behind the zipper.

Using the sewing machine, stitch the side fabric strip to the first circle of fabric with a 3/8″ seam allowance. Then pin and sew to the second circle. Trim the extra thread, remove any remaining pins, and turn the pillow.
Stuff as much buckwheat hull as you can into the pillow. This is a little tricky, as buckwheat hulls are tiny and quite devious. Also, they really hurt under bare feet. Fill it as much as you can, shake it down, and fill some more. I used almost all of the 5 lbs. of buckwheat hulls I purchased. Once it’s full, try it out. You may find that you’d be more comfortable with more or less filling – hence the zipper. (And, I’ll admit, I’m terrible at blindstitching. The zipper is my way of cheating.)

If you want to make your circles a different diameter, here is how you calculate where to place your pleats and how long a strip of fabric you need: Multiply the diameter of your fabric circle by pi (3.14159.) This will give you the circumference; for a 13″ diameter, I got a 40.84″ circumference. Add 1″ for the zipper seams (=41.84″.) For 14 pleats, each 3/4″ and using 1 1/2″ of fabric, add 21″ (=62.84″.) Add a couple of inches for fudging purposes, so you’ll be sure not to run out of fabric and have to start all over again (=65″.)
To determine where to put your pleats, take the length of your fabric strip, minus the 1″ of seam allowance and 2″ or so for fudging allowance (in my case, 62″.) Divide by 15 (=4.13″.) Round off as best as you can (=4″.) Remember to add your 1/2″ seam allowance for the measurement before the first pleat (=4 1/2″.)
Zabuton
Materials:

  • Cotton/polyester blend fabric, 1 1/2 yards
  • Polyester, cotton, or kapok stuffing, ~2 lbs.
  • Sewing thread, machine, etc.

Cut two rectangles of fabric, 32 1/2″ x 27 1/2″ (if you’re over 6′ tall, add a few inches to both dimensions. You need it to be big enough to accommodate you when sitting crosslegged with your knees comfortably cushioned on the zabuton.) Note: Cutting a straight line that long can be difficult. In order to make sure that my cuts are indeed straight, and that I end up with 90o angles, I use the pulled thread method for cutting straight lines in the fabric.

Pin the rectangles together and stitch around the edges with a 3/8″ seam allowance, leaving an opening about 4″ wide on one side for turning and stuffing. Make sure to backstitch at the corners and on both sides of the opening. If you like, you can stitch a small curve on the edges or add a rise, but it’s not necessary.
Turn and stuff. A word about polyester stuffing: it’s tempting to just grab wads of stuffing and jam it in there without a care in the world, but you’ll end up with a lumpy, unusable pillow. Take the time to do it right. Grab a handful of stuffing and pinch off little pieces. You can make a big pile of pinched stuffing and then stuff the pillow by the handful. You’ll use a lot less stuffing this way, and your zabuton will be nice and fluffy – not lumpy.

Once the zabuton is stuffed to your liking (I stuffed to about a 2″ rise,) stitch the opening shut. To keep the stuffing from shifting about too much, tuft the zabuton. I added four tufts, each about 8″ from the corners toward the center of the pillow. To tuft, take a sewing needle and an 18″ length of thread. Double your thread and pierce both layers of the pillow; pull the needle through, but leave a few inches of thread on top. Bring the needle back through both layers of pillow near the first stitch. Pull both ends of the thread tight and tie it off carefully. Clip the extra thread.

…and you’re done!
Yoga with Gail

StarFruit ZaZen Zafu ZaButton Meditation Cushion

Yoga with Gaileee Zafu Meditation Cushion

Yoga with Gaileee Zafu Meditation Cushion

StarFruit ZaZen Zafu ZaButton Meditation Cushion! Cool.

Look what my mom made me after I took a photo of one at Lex Gillan’s Advance Yoga training in 2013. Cool!

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