Top Three Benefits of Yoga for Beginning Students

The Top Three Benefits of Yoga for the Beginning Student

Top Three Yoga Benefits

Top Three Benefits of Yoga for the Beginning Student.

I teach beginners yoga at my church. You have to start somewhere….why not with someone who loves to teach to beginners?

With beginners yoga, you learn with an experienced teacher (over 19 years of teaching experience).

Discover How to: Ease Back Pain, Lessen Stress, Lose Weight and more!

Additional benefits can include: Better Balance, Increased Flexibility, Gain Strength, Build Bones, and Lower Your Blood Pressure.

Gail Pickens-Barger, 409-727-3177 for your yoga questions, plus I teach a mat yoga class on Mondays at 6:15 PM, chair yoga class on Thursdays at 10;00 AM, plus teach at corporations, yoga for your place of business.

See you at Wesley UMC, 3515 Helena Avenue, for the two public classes, and call me for your place of business or private yoga!

Yoga Mat Bag – sewing instructions

Yoga Mat Bag – Sewing instructions

Yoga Mat Bag How To DIY instructions.

You can’t sit and sew home decor projects all day long. Sometimes you need an exercise break … but not a break from style. We fell head-over-heels for Amy Butler’s Love fabric collection and knew it would be perfect for our yoga tote. We then calmly meditated on the easiest instructions with the most stylish details. The result guarantees good karma for all who tote this tote to class.

Our generously-sized bag will hold your mat, towel, flip flops and more. We recommend choosing a heavier weight fabric for the bag so it’s sturdier and wears well. Amy Butler’s Love collection has several home decor weights from which to choose. Your lining can be regular weight.

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Sewing Tools You Need

  • Any Sewing Machine

Fabric and Other Supplies

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  • 1 yard of 54″ wide fabric for bag: we used Amy Butler’s Love Sandlewood in Periwinkle – home decor weight
  • 1 yard 45″ wide coordinating fabric for lining: we used Amy Butler’s Love Sun Spots in Turquoise – fashion/quilting weight
  • 3 yards of 2″ wide cotton webbing for handles: we used an organic white cotton
  • 1 large (apx. 1″) wooden button
  • All-purpose thread in colors to match fabrics
  • See-through ruler
  • Fabric pencil
  • Iron and ironing board
  • Scissors or rotary cutter and mat
  • Straight pins

Getting Started

  1. From the fabric for your bag (Amy Butler’s Love Sandlewood in Periwinkle – home decor weight in our sample) cut two 33″ wide x 14″ high rectangles.
  2. From the fabric for your lining (Amy Butler’s Love Sun Spots in Turquoise in our sample) cut two 33″ wide x 14″ high rectangles.
  3. From the fabric for your lining, also cut one 4″ x 4″ square.
  4. Cut your cotton webbing into two 52″ lengths.

At Your Sewing Machine & Ironing Board

Attach handles

  1. To place the cotton webbing for the handles, first make four marks with your fabric pencil on each outside bag fabric 33″ x 14″ rectangle: 9″ in from each corner.
    Diagram
  2. Starting with one length of webbing and one fabric rectangle, position the end of the webbing flush with the bottom and aligned with the 9″ marks. Pin in place.
  3. Run straight up, make a 24″ loop to create the handle, then run the webbing back down the other side, lining up with your 9″ marks. Pin as you go.
  4. Repeat with other outside fabric rectangle and other length of webbing.
    Diagram
  5. Top stitch webbing to fabric along both sides and across the bottom. Your stitching on all straps should end approximately 1″ from the top raw edge so you have room for a top seam allowance.
    Diagram
  6. To reinforce the top of each strap, again starting 1″ below the top raw edge of the bag, stitch a 1″ – 2″ square.
    Diagram

Stitch bag pieces and lining pieces together

  1. Pin the two outside bag pieces right sides together, making sure the strapping matches up at the bottom and the handles are sandwiched in between the layers – out of the way of all seams.
  2. Using a ½” seam, stitch down both sides and across bottom of bag. Press seams open.
    Diagram
  3. Take your two 33″ x 14″ lining pieces and pin them right sides together.
  4. Using a ½” seam, stitch down both sides and across bottom of lining. Press seams open.

Create the gusset

  1. Press the main bag piece, so the bottom seam is very sharp.
  2. Open bag and fold in the opposite direction, matching the side seams. The bottom of the bag will naturally fold in on itself, creating two matching triangles. Very carefully align the side folds and the top points to ensure your gusset will be exactly even.
    Diagram
  3. Measure approximately 2″ down from the top tip of the triangle and use your fabric pencil to draw a line straight across the folded fabric. Your line should be at a point that is approximately 5″ wide.
    Diagram
    Click to Enlarge
  4. Repeat on the opposite side. Check to make sure your two drawn lines are at the exact same place on both sides.
  5. Unfold and stitch across along on the 5″ drawn line on each side.
    Diagram
  6. Trim the top of each triangle ½” from the sewn line.
    Diagram
    Click to Enlarge
  7. Repeat steps 1-6 to create the gusset in the lining.

Make the button loop

  1. Take the 4″ x 4″ square of lining fabric and fold it in half diagonally, right sides together.
  2. Stitch ½” away from fold. Folding and stitching on the diagonal will make your loop bias-cut, which will allow it to curve without wrinkling.
    Click to Enlarge
  3. Trim the seam allowance to ¼” and turn right side out, using a safety pin or loop turner. Press flat.
  4. Find the top center point of the side that will be the ‘back’ of your bag. Make a mark at this center point with your fabric pencil. Then, still using your fabric pencil, draw a short horizontal line along the ½” seam line.
  5. Fold your loop in half and pin it at the center point mark you just made in step 4. Adjust the loop so enough of it extends past the seam line for the button to pass through easily. Don’t guess. Test it with your actual button. Pin the loop in place.
    Click to Enlarge
  6. Stitch the loop down, running forward and backwards several times so your loop is secure and can stand up to lots of wear and tear. Trim away excess.

Finish the bag

  1. Finish the raw edge of both the main bag and the lining with pinking shears or a zig zag stitch. For more thoughts about finishing, read our tutorial: Finishing Raw Seams: Part One – Sewing Machine Finishes.
  2. Turn lining inside out. Keep the bag right side out.
  3. Place bag inside the lining so right sides of bag and lining are together. Pin around the top edge matching seams and centers and tucking straps down. Leave about 8″ open for turning.
    Diagram
  4. Stitch, using a ½” seam allowance, making sure not to catch the straps. Remember to leave about 8″ unstitched for turning.
  5. Turn right side out and press top edge flat. The edges of your 8″ opening should be folded in ½” to match your seam allowance.
  6. Top stitch around the entire top of tote. For a clean look, fold handles down and stitch BEHIND the handles not over the top of them.
    Click to Enlarge
  7. Hand sew the wooden button to the center of the front of the bag, opposite the loop.
    Click to Enlarge

Contributors 
Project Design: Alicia Thommas
Sample Creation: Jacqueline Smerek

Love this pattern.  Had to find it off of Archive.org to get the instructions!

Yoga Gear & Props Sewing Patterns – Pinterest Site

Yoga Gear & Props Sewing Patterns – Pinterest Site

http://pinterest.com/yogakiddos/yoga-sewing-patterns/

 

Getting a bit back into sewing these days.  Need to get out the serger and cover stitch machine!  Woo!

15 Reasons to Start or Re-Start a regular yoga practice – Nederland, Texas

15 Reasons to Start or Re-Start your regular yoga practice.   Beginners Yoga in Nederland & Beaumont Texas

Count on Yoga.  Looking for a reason to start practicing (or restart your practice)?

1. Flex Time.

Improved flexibility is one of the most obvious benefits of yoga.  During your first class, you probably won’t be able to touch your toes, never mind do a back bend.  But if you stick with it, you’ll notice a gradual loosening, and eventually, seemingly impossible poses will become possible.  You’ll probably notice that aches and pains start to disappear.  That’s no coincidence.  Tight hips can strain the knee joint due to improper alignment of the thigh and shinbones.  Tight hamstrings can lead to a flattening of the lumbar spine, which can cause back pain. And inflexibility in muscles and connective tissues, such as fascia and ligaments, can cause poor posture.

2. Bone Zone.

It’s well documented that weight-bearing exercise strengthens bones and helps ward off osteoporosis.  Many postures in yoga require that you lift your own weight.  And some, like Downward- and Upward-Facing Dog, help strengthen the arm bones, which are particularly vulnerable to osteoporosis fractures.  In an unpublished study conducted at California State University, Los Angeles, yoga practice increased bone density in the vertrebrae.  Yoga’s ability to lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol may help keep calcium in the bones.

3. Worry Thwarts.

Yoga lowers cortisol levels. If that doesn’t sound like much, consider these facts.  Normally, the adrenal glands secrete cortisol in response to an acute crisis, which temporarily boosts immune function.  If your cortisol levels stay high even after the crisis, they can compromise the immune system.  Temporary boosts of cortisol help with long-term memory, but chronically high levels undermine memory and may lead to permanent changes in the brain.  Plus, excessive cortisol has been linked with major depression, osteoporosis (it extracts calcium and other minerals from bones and interferes with the laying down of new bone), high blood pressure, and insulin resistance.  In rats, high cortisol levels lead to what researchers call “food-seeking behavior” (the kind that drives you to eat when you’re upset, angry, or stressed).  The body takes those extra calories and distributes them as fat in the abdomen, contributing to weight gain and the risk of diabetes and heart attack.

4. Breathing Room.

Yogis tend to take fewer breaths of greater volume, which is both calming and more efficient.  A 1998 study published in The Lancet taught a yogic technique known as “complete breathing” to people with lung problems due to congestive heart failure.  After one month, their average respiratory rate decreased from 13.4 breaths per minute to 7.6.  Meanwhile, their exercise capacity increased significantly, as did the oxygen saturation of their blood.  In addition, yoga has been shown to improve various measures of lung function, including the maximum volume of the breath and the efficiency of the exhalation.

5. Pain Drain.

Yoga can ease your pain.  According to several studies, yoga postures (asana), meditiation, or a combination of the two, reduced pain in people with arthritis, back pain, fibromyalgia, carpal tunnel syndrome, and other chronic conditions.  When you relieve your pain, your mood improves, you’re more inclined to be active, and you don’t need as much medication.

6. Connective Tissue.

As you read all the ways yoga improves your health, you probably notice a lot of overlap.  That’s because they are intensely interwoven.  Change your posture and you change the way you breathe.  Change your breathing and you change you nervous system.  This is one of the great lessons of yoga:  Everything is connected – your hipbone to your anklebone, you to your community, your community to the world.  Such interconnection is vital to yoga.  This holistic system simultaneously taps into many mechanisms that have self-perpetuating and even multiplicative effects.  Synergy may be the most important way of all that yoga heals.

7. Joint Account.

Each time you practice yoga, you take your joints through their full range of motion.  This can help prevent degenerative arthritis or mitigate disability by “squeezing and soaking” areas of cartilage that normally aren’t used.  Joint cartilage is like sponge; it receives fresh nutrients only when its fluid is squeezed out and a new supply can be soaked up.  Without proper sustenance, neglected cartilage can eventually wear out like worn-out brake pads, exposing the underlying bone.

8. Flow Chart.

Yoga gets your blood flowing.  More specifically, the relaxation exercises you learn in yoga can help your circulation, especially in your hands and feet.  Yoga also gets more oxygen to your cells, which function better as a result.  Twisting poses are thought to wring out venous blood from internal organs and allow oxygenated blood to flow in once the twist is released.  Inverted poses, such as Down Ward Facing Dog, Standing Straddle Splits, Headstand, Handstand and Shoulderstand, encourages venous blood from the legs and pelvis to flow back to the heart, where it can be pumped to the lungs to be freshly oxygenated.  Yoga also boosts levels of hemoglobin and red blood cells, which carry oxygen to the tissues.  And it thins the blood by making platelets less sticky and by cutting the level of clot-promoting proteins in the blood.  This can lead to a decrease in heart attacks and strokes since blood clots are often the cause of these killers.

9.  Heart Start.

When you regularly get your heart rate into the aerobic range, you can lower your risk of heart attack and relieve depression.  While not all yoga is aerobic, if you do it vigorously or take flow or Ashtanga classes, it can boost your heart rate into the aerobic range.  But even yoga exercises that don’t get your heart rate up that high can improve cardiovascular conditioning.  Studies have found that yoga practice lowers the resting heart rate, increases endurance, and can improve your maximum uptake of oxygen during exercise – all reflections of improving aerobic conditioning.

10. Strength Test.

Strong muscles do more than look good.  They also protect us from such conditions as arthritis and back pain, and help prevent falls.  And when you build strength through yoga, you balance it with flexibility.  If you just lifted weights, you might build strength at the expense of flexibility.

11. Spinal Rap.

Spinal disks – the shock absorbers between the vertebrae that can herniate and compress nerves – crave movement.  That’s the only way they get their nutrients.  If you’ve got a well-balanced asana practice with plently of backbends, forward bends, and twists, you’ll help keep your disks supple.

12. Standing Orders.

Your head is like a bowling ball – big, round, and heavy.  When it’s balanced directly over an erect spine, it take much less work for your neck and back muscles to support it. Move it several inches forward, however, and you start to strain those muscles.  Hold up that forward-leaning bowling ball for 8 or 12 hours a day and it’s no wonder you’re tired.  And fatigue might not be your only problem.  Poor posture can cause back, neck, and other muscle and joint problems.  As you slump, your body may compensate by flattening the normal inward curves in your neck and lower back.  This can cause pain and degenerative arthritis of the spine.

13. Sugar Show.

Yoga lowers blood sugar and LDL (“bad”) cholesterol and boosts HDL (“good”) cholesterol.  In people wit diabetes, yoga has been found to lower blood sugar in several ways:  by lowering cortisol and adrenaline levels, encouraging weight loss, and improving sensitivity to the effects of insulin.  Get your blood sugar levels down, and you decrease your risk of diabetic complications such as heart attack, kidney failure and blindness.

14. Space Place.

Regularly practicing yoga increases proprioception (the ability to feel what your body is doing and where it is in space) and improves balance.  People with bad posture or dysfunctional movement patterns usually have poor proprioception, which has been linked to knee problems and back pain. Better balance could mean fewer falls.  For the elderly, this translates into more independence and delayed admission to a nursing home or never entering one at all.

15. Loose Limbs.

Do you ever notice yourself holding the telephone or a steering wheel with a death grip or scrunching your face when staring at a computer screen?  These unconscious habits can lead to chronic tension, muscle fatigue, and soreness in the wrists, arms, shoulders, neck, and face, which can increase stress and worsen your mood.  As you practice yoga, you begin to notice where you hold tension:  It might be in your tongue, your eyes, or the muscles of your face and neck.  If you simple tune in and pay more attention to these areas, you may be able to relieve some tension.

To see all 38 ways yoga can improve your health and well-being click on over to the Yoga Journal Website. http://www.yogajournal.com/health/1634

Beginners Yoga on Mondays at 6:15 PM at Wesley UMC. $10.  Bring a yoga mat?  Got questions on yoga, call Gail at 409-727-3177.  If my class or schedule does not match, I’ll find you a class or private teacher to work with!

Adaptive Chair Yoga at Wesley United Methodist Church in Nederland, Texas, 3515 Helena Avenue on Thursday at 10:00 a.m.  $5 Come early if it is your first time!  See you in 2019!

beginneryogaseries2019

Props and Gear for your Yoga practice – sew them up!

Props and Gear for your Yoga practice – sew them up!

Sew if you have any sewing ability, you can make these items for your Yoga practice.

  • yogamatbagA Yoga Bag by Amy Butler  – Yoga Mat Bag 

  • A Lavender Eye Pillow by Amy Butler – Lavender Eye Peyepillowillow

  • A cool headband, to keep that hair out of the way …. at Headband for the hair!

diyheadbandcollection

Head Scarf 1 

Head Scarf 2

Head Scarf 3 

Head Scarf 4

Head Scarf 5

zafu1

Part I on Zafu Instructions

zafu3

Part II

zafu2

Zafu III

.

zafu4

Last Zafu instruction

  • Make your own bolsters. Now I found an article in one of my sewing books,
    “Sewing for the Outdoors”, but then I found this on the internet… the same concept.
    I used a roll of quilt batting, figured out how circle part on the bottom….well, kinda like the instructions for the yoga mat. Here are some links.

 

Stuff Sack Instruction #1

I used some cotton material that I had around the house. I used this same concept, to cover a neck roll that I had so that I could also use this in restorative yoga poses.

Here’s another link for making a stuff sack, or a cover for your cylinder shaped bolster…

stuffsack_step14

Stuff Sack Instructions #2

and lastly here is another link for making the “stuffed bolster sack…”

Stuff Sack Instructions #3

Enjoy making your own yoga props!

Gail Pickens-Barger, International and Experience Certified and Registered Yoga Teacher

Props and Gear for your Yoga practice . . .

Props and Gear for your Yoga practice.

Yoga with Gaileee Zafu Meditation Cushion

Yoga with Gail –  Star Meditation Cushion

Sew if you have any sewing ability, you can make these items for your Yoga practice.

Seiza

How to make a Seiza

Seiza1

First, what is a seiza? It is a bench to sit on during kneeling meditation.

Sitting_Seiza

Do I need one? Nope.

WHAT YOU NEED

  • A sheet of wood, ¾-inch (2 cm) thick, and approximately 20 by 20 inches (52 cm). Alternatively, you might use scraps of wood of various sizes, according to the actual sections required.
  • At least ten 1¼-inch (3 cm) countersink woodscrews
  • A hand saw for wood (a cross-cut hand saw, if available, or possibly an electric table saw/rip saw)
  • A drill (or powerdrill), a small drill bit for wood, and a countersink bit or a countersink tool
  • Wood glue
  • Two or more C-clamps
  • Sandpaper (and perhaps a disc-sander)

CHOOSING THE WOOD

Any strong, solid wood used for furniture will work. Be sure the wood doesn’t bend easily (you’ll be sitting on this), and that it wont split when screws are put into the narrow sides.

A solid, single piece of wood like pine or cedar will probably look better and be easier to work with — especially if you plan to varnish or stain the wood later. Avoid standard plywood and chipboard, which will probably bend, flake or disintegrate. Make sure your wood is flat and not warped. Solid scraps of wood that match the sizes needed could work fine as well; your seiza doesn’t need to be fancy, just functional.

CUTTING THE LENGTHS

You need to cut five pieces of wood, like this:

seiza2

MAKING THE LEGS

Ensuring symmetry

After cutting, the parts may be a little rough — one leg may not exactly match the other. Even wood bought from a shop may not have edges that are exactly straight.

To fix this, simply clamp the legs together and sand the edges until they all match. If you can, get a few of the sides to line up before starting; it will provide a good reference point. Try to clamp the sides together in an ‘average’ position, to minimize how much sanding is needed. Don’t worry about detail sanding right now, such as rounding corners for aesthetic purposes. Right now you just want things to line up.

Before long, you should have two identical legs.

THE FIRST LEG

Attach the reinforcement to the inside edge of the leg, in the center of the slanted edge. Like this:
Seiza3

Line up the edges of the two pieces as best you can. Measure the distance to both edges, so that the little piece is in the middle of the leg’s edge. Clamp the two pieces together using C-clamps. Place one at each side, along the flat edges (not the slanted edge) of the leg, so that they’re not in the way of your work. You need to small drill holes in the pieces. The holes shown here are bigger, for clarity.

Seiza4

Using a drill, bore two pilot holes for screws into both pieces of wood. Pilot holes guide the screws and prevent the wood from splitting. Use a drill bit around half the diameter of the woodscrews, or a little smaller. If the diameter is too large, the woodscrews won’t get a strong grip and the seiza could break easily.

After drilling the pilot holes, you to countersink them. Countersink screws have a triangular head with a flat top, designed to sit flush with the surface of the wood. Countersinking makes a similar triangular shape into the top of the pilot hole, to allow the woodscrew to be flush to the surface:

Seiza5

Once the pilot holes are drilled and countersinking is done, join the pieces together. Release the C-clamps, add a little glue between the pieces, re-clamp, and screw the pieces together. Be careful to put the screws in from the outside — from the larger leg, into the smaller reinforcement:

Make sure the screws are tight, wipe off any excess glue, and leave it to dry for a few minutes.

THE SECOND LEG

Be careful which side you attach the reinforcement to on the second leg. It needs to be the opposite of the first. Take the first piece, and place it with the slant coming down from the back to the front. Whichever side the reinforcement is on will be the inside. Take the other leg, and place it further over, across the inside edge, and then place the second reinforcement on the new leg’s inside edge:

Seiza6

Line up the pieces, clamp them together, drill and countersink the pilot holes, unclamp, glue, clamp again, and finally screw the pieces together. Remember to drill the holes and put the screws in from the outside edge, opposite the reinforcement, and when finished, allow some time for the glue to set before removing the clamps.

COMPLETING THE LEGS

When the legs are assembled, sand off the top slanted edge to make sure that the reinforcement and the leg edge are even. The seat should be flat against the legs to best distribute your weight evenly.

THE SEAT

Place the seat on top of the two legs, making sure the reinforcements are on the inside edge. Line everything up, so that the edges of the seat are tight against the edges of the legs.

You could move the legs in slightly to allow the seat to overhang the legs, creating a more interesting shape. This could make it more difficult to line up the seat screws, and you need to have enough space for your legs underneath the bench.

Clamp your seat down by placing the C-clamps around the seat and the reinforcement bars. If you have a limited number of clamps, place them diagonally opposite around the seat. Even two clamps will do, but four would be ideal.

Drill and countersink three pilot holes in each side of the seat. Two should go through the seat into each leg, and the other should be further in, so that it goes into the reinforcement. Measure all the distances carefully, so that the screws are centered and symmetrical on each side. Something like this:

Seiza7

It’s particularly important to countersink the holes properly, since they’re on the seat that you’re going to sit on. If they’re not deep enough, the screws will sit up and be rough. Once the holes are drilled, release the clamps and apply glue to the top of the legs. Re-clamp, and screw down. Leave the clamps for a while so the glue can dry.

Once the glue dries, you’re done!

Finishing

Finally, check once more that it sits well. Hopefully, you won’t have any major problems with one leg an inch lower than the other. If you notice a little rocking, it should be easy to fix by sanding the bottom surfaces to be even.

You can cover the screw holes completely with a product called ‘plastic wood.’ Or try just mixing some wood glue with sawdust you made earlier, place it into the recessed screw hole, and sanding it down when dry.

You have a few finishing options. You can stain it to match your other furniture, or make it look like a more interesting kind of wood perhaps — or you can varnish it to give it a professional, glossy finish that’s easy to clean.

A smooth well-sanded surface is important. You don’t want to sit on, or even carry a seat that’s rough. Splinters aren’t much fun! If you are planning to use a varnish, sanding will be an important first step. Sanding by hand is pretty simple — just keep going in a circular pattern, with very light pressure, until things feel smooth. Pay particular attention to corners and edges. It’s nice to get those smoothly curved — especially at the front where your legs will leave the seat.

Suggestions

The folks at the WildMind website suggest that seiza benches require more hand support than other meditation methods. You may want to use an extra pillow to support your hands more fully above your waist as you kneel. WildMind has lots of great guidance on posture, though — I’d suggest referring to that site, if you’re having difficulties.

About this guide

http://www.michiganbuddhist.com/seiza – original site

  • And make your own bolsters. Now I found an article in one of my sewing books, “Sewing for the Outdoors”, but then I found this on the internet… the same concept. I used a roll of quilt batting, figured out how circle part on the bottom….well, kinda like the instructions for the yoga mat. Here’s a link…

I used some cotton material that I had around the house. I used this same concept, to cover a neck roll that I had so that I could also use this in restorative yoga poses.

Here’s another link for making a stuff sack, or a cover for your cylinder shaped bolster…

p.s.s. Update,Simplicity 3583 and McCalls 4261. Get them when they are on sale at Hobby Lobby or JoAnn’s Fabric Store, or Hancocks.

Yoga for Osteoporosis

Yoga for Osteoporosis or Osteopenia

First Twelve Yoga Poses and Second Twelve Yoga Poses for Osteopenia and Osteoporosis bone-building efforts.

osteoporosis _ Osteopenia Packing List

Love working with folks to help them back to having healthy bones!  Work with me to help you build back your bone density through the two sets of 12 yoga poses, that use the muscles that will stimulate bone growth!  Call Gail Pickens-Barger, 409-727-3177.  Please leave a voice message, if I am unable to answer your call.  I will return your message.  Thank you!

osteofirstsecondposes

The second set of poses are to address the bone-building issues with the wrists, elbows, and shoulders.  Additionally giving additional weight bearing poses to complement the first set of yoga poses.

The second set of poses are to address the bone-building issues with the wrists, elbows, and shoulders.  Additionally giving additional weight bearing poses to complement the first set of yoga poses.

Dr. Loren Fishman has come up with a second set of poses to use for bone building.  Beginners versions of the poses, intermediate and classical versions of the poses.  Nice that you can mix and match depending on your body’s ability to do a pose.

Interested?  Give me a call, Gail Pickens-Barger, 409-727-3177, leave a voice message if I am unable to get to your phone call.   We can work together to get you started on your bone building journey!