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#BeginnersYoga #chairyoga #gentleyogaforlowbackcare back pain yoga Ease Upper and Lower Back Pain with Yoga Yoga for Back Pain Yoga for Easing Back Pain

Decide. That’s all.

Decide. That’s all.

You want to feel better? The hardest part of self-care is getting yourself to do it.

For the cost of a special coffee and a half, you'd have access to a live streaming  yoga class or a video to do to start addressing your issues with your tissues ==> https://paypal.me/Yogawithgail/10  
You're worth it!
For the cost of a special coffee and a half, you’d have access to a live streaming yoga class or a video to do to start addressing your issues with your tissues ==> https://paypal.me/Yogawithgail/10
You’re worth it!

Here is what it takes: Decide. That’s all.

Just Decide You Want To Feel Better.

Then decide When you are going to do it.

It doesn’t take long. Just a few minutes. Set the timer.

Do treatment while watching TV. Listen to a podcast.

Or just space out and roll onto the floor do some stretches, or roll your body on the wall.

Words of wisdom from a recent training I took, in trying to manage my own pain.

Back Pain? Try my beginners Yoga class on Zoom Monday Nights at 6 PM CST. Can’t make it? I’ll send you the video from the class after you’ve paid and registered for the class. Pay, then I send you the registration link.

Thank you.

==> https://paypal.me/Yogawithgail/10

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#BeginnersYoga #chairyoga #chairyogafitness 15 reasons to do yoga 5 Fab Benefits of Prenatal Yoga Beginners Yoga with Gail Pickens-Barger Ease Upper and Lower Back Pain with Yoga Health Conditions Helped by Yoga

15 Reasons to Start or Re-Start a regular yoga practice – Nederland, Texas

15 Reasons to Start or Re-Start your regular yoga practice.   Beginners Yoga in Nederland & Beaumont Texas

Count on Yoga.  Looking for a reason to start practicing (or restart your practice)? Updated January 2021

1. Flex Time.

Improved flexibility is one of the most obvious benefits of yoga.  During your first class, you probably won’t be able to touch your toes, never mind do a back bend.  But if you stick with it, you’ll notice a gradual loosening, and eventually, seemingly impossible poses will become possible.  You’ll probably notice that aches and pains start to disappear.  That’s no coincidence.  Tight hips can strain the knee joint due to improper alignment of the thigh and shinbones.  Tight hamstrings can lead to a flattening of the lumbar spine, which can cause back pain. And inflexibility in muscles and connective tissues, such as fascia and ligaments, can cause poor posture.

2. Bone Zone.

It’s well documented that weight-bearing exercise strengthens bones and helps ward off osteoporosis.  Many postures in yoga require that you lift your own weight.  And some, like Downward- and Upward-Facing Dog, help strengthen the arm bones, which are particularly vulnerable to osteoporosis fractures.  In an unpublished study conducted at California State University, Los Angeles, yoga practice increased bone density in the vertrebrae.  Yoga’s ability to lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol may help keep calcium in the bones.

3. Worry Thwarts.

Yoga lowers cortisol levels. If that doesn’t sound like much, consider these facts.  Normally, the adrenal glands secrete cortisol in response to an acute crisis, which temporarily boosts immune function.  If your cortisol levels stay high even after the crisis, they can compromise the immune system.  Temporary boosts of cortisol help with long-term memory, but chronically high levels undermine memory and may lead to permanent changes in the brain.  Plus, excessive cortisol has been linked with major depression, osteoporosis (it extracts calcium and other minerals from bones and interferes with the laying down of new bone), high blood pressure, and insulin resistance.  In rats, high cortisol levels lead to what researchers call “food-seeking behavior” (the kind that drives you to eat when you’re upset, angry, or stressed).  The body takes those extra calories and distributes them as fat in the abdomen, contributing to weight gain and the risk of diabetes and heart attack.

4. Breathing Room.

Yogis tend to take fewer breaths of greater volume, which is both calming and more efficient.  A 1998 study published in The Lancet taught a yogic technique known as “complete breathing” to people with lung problems due to congestive heart failure.  After one month, their average respiratory rate decreased from 13.4 breaths per minute to 7.6.  Meanwhile, their exercise capacity increased significantly, as did the oxygen saturation of their blood.  In addition, yoga has been shown to improve various measures of lung function, including the maximum volume of the breath and the efficiency of the exhalation.

5. Pain Drain.

Yoga can ease your pain.  According to several studies, yoga postures (asana), meditiation, or a combination of the two, reduced pain in people with arthritis, back pain, fibromyalgia, carpal tunnel syndrome, and other chronic conditions.  When you relieve your pain, your mood improves, you’re more inclined to be active, and you don’t need as much medication.

6. Connective Tissue.

As you read all the ways yoga improves your health, you probably notice a lot of overlap.  That’s because they are intensely interwoven.  Change your posture and you change the way you breathe.  Change your breathing and you change you nervous system.  This is one of the great lessons of yoga:  Everything is connected – your hipbone to your anklebone, you to your community, your community to the world.  Such interconnection is vital to yoga.  This holistic system simultaneously taps into many mechanisms that have self-perpetuating and even multiplicative effects.  Synergy may be the most important way of all that yoga heals.

7. Joint Account.

Each time you practice yoga, you take your joints through their full range of motion.  This can help prevent degenerative arthritis or mitigate disability by “squeezing and soaking” areas of cartilage that normally aren’t used.  Joint cartilage is like sponge; it receives fresh nutrients only when its fluid is squeezed out and a new supply can be soaked up.  Without proper sustenance, neglected cartilage can eventually wear out like worn-out brake pads, exposing the underlying bone.

8. Flow Chart.

Yoga gets your blood flowing.  More specifically, the relaxation exercises you learn in yoga can help your circulation, especially in your hands and feet.  Yoga also gets more oxygen to your cells, which function better as a result.  Twisting poses are thought to wring out venous blood from internal organs and allow oxygenated blood to flow in once the twist is released.  Inverted poses, such as Down Ward Facing Dog, Standing Straddle Splits, Headstand, Handstand and Shoulderstand, encourages venous blood from the legs and pelvis to flow back to the heart, where it can be pumped to the lungs to be freshly oxygenated.  Yoga also boosts levels of hemoglobin and red blood cells, which carry oxygen to the tissues.  And it thins the blood by making platelets less sticky and by cutting the level of clot-promoting proteins in the blood.  This can lead to a decrease in heart attacks and strokes since blood clots are often the cause of these killers.

9.  Heart Start.

When you regularly get your heart rate into the aerobic range, you can lower your risk of heart attack and relieve depression.  While not all yoga is aerobic, if you do it vigorously or take flow or Ashtanga classes, it can boost your heart rate into the aerobic range.  But even yoga exercises that don’t get your heart rate up that high can improve cardiovascular conditioning.  Studies have found that yoga practice lowers the resting heart rate, increases endurance, and can improve your maximum uptake of oxygen during exercise – all reflections of improving aerobic conditioning.

10. Strength Test.

Strong muscles do more than look good.  They also protect us from such conditions as arthritis and back pain, and help prevent falls.  And when you build strength through yoga, you balance it with flexibility.  If you just lifted weights, you might build strength at the expense of flexibility.

11. Spinal Rap.

Spinal disks – the shock absorbers between the vertebrae that can herniate and compress nerves – crave movement.  That’s the only way they get their nutrients.  If you’ve got a well-balanced asana practice with plently of backbends, forward bends, and twists, you’ll help keep your disks supple.

12. Standing Orders.

Your head is like a bowling ball – big, round, and heavy.  When it’s balanced directly over an erect spine, it take much less work for your neck and back muscles to support it. Move it several inches forward, however, and you start to strain those muscles.  Hold up that forward-leaning bowling ball for 8 or 12 hours a day and it’s no wonder you’re tired.  And fatigue might not be your only problem.  Poor posture can cause back, neck, and other muscle and joint problems.  As you slump, your body may compensate by flattening the normal inward curves in your neck and lower back.  This can cause pain and degenerative arthritis of the spine.

13. Sugar Show.

Yoga lowers blood sugar and LDL (“bad”) cholesterol and boosts HDL (“good”) cholesterol.  In people wit diabetes, yoga has been found to lower blood sugar in several ways:  by lowering cortisol and adrenaline levels, encouraging weight loss, and improving sensitivity to the effects of insulin.  Get your blood sugar levels down, and you decrease your risk of diabetic complications such as heart attack, kidney failure and blindness.

14. Space Place.

Regularly practicing yoga increases proprioception (the ability to feel what your body is doing and where it is in space) and improves balance.  People with bad posture or dysfunctional movement patterns usually have poor proprioception, which has been linked to knee problems and back pain. Better balance could mean fewer falls.  For the elderly, this translates into more independence and delayed admission to a nursing home or never entering one at all.

15. Loose Limbs.

Do you ever notice yourself holding the telephone or a steering wheel with a death grip or scrunching your face when staring at a computer screen?  These unconscious habits can lead to chronic tension, muscle fatigue, and soreness in the wrists, arms, shoulders, neck, and face, which can increase stress and worsen your mood.  As you practice yoga, you begin to notice where you hold tension:  It might be in your tongue, your eyes, or the muscles of your face and neck.  If you simple tune in and pay more attention to these areas, you may be able to relieve some tension.

To see all 38 ways yoga can improve your health and well-being click on over to the Yoga Journal Website. http://www.yogajournal.com/health/1634

Beginners Yoga on Mondays at 6:00 PM at Wesley UMC.  Now being held online due to our world’s health crisis.  Get into the Yoga Zoom room by first paying your class fee, then you’ll be sent an email to register to get into the class.  Here’s the sign up link.

==> https://paypal.me/Yogawithgail/10

Got questions on yoga, call Gail at 409-727-3177.  If my class or schedule does not match, I’ll find you a class or private teacher to work with!

Gentle Yoga, Beginners Yoga, Yoga with Gail in Beaumont and Nederland Texas.
Gentle Yoga, Beginners Yoga, Yoga with Gail in Beaumont and Nederland Texas.

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Multiple Sclerosis Yoga – Nederland/Beaumont Texas

Chair Yoga (1)

During our world’s health crisis, The National MS Society sponsors a free Adaptive Yoga class for those who have MS and their support people.  Currently the chair yoga is offered through a rotating list of free Youtube Videos on Gail Pickens-Barger channel.  Playlist listed here ==> Chair Yoga Fitness Videos

Join Experienced Registered Yoga Teacher, Gail Pickens-Barger for an hour-long class.  This adaptive, gentle yoga class is a great way to add exercise into your life as well as the added benefit of meeting new people living with MS.

Yoga classes focus on movement and breathing-this will help to increase your muscle tone, and improve balance, coordination and overall body control.  We hope to see you soon.  This class is offered exclusively for people living with MS and is free of charge.  Call Gail Pickens-Barger at 409 – 727 – 3177 or email gaileee@yahoo.com for more information.

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Yoga Reduces Fatigue In Multiple Sclerosis Patients, OHSU Study Finds

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Wesley UMC, 3515 Helena Avenue, Nederland, Texas 77627

ScienceDaily (June 10, 2004) — PORTLAND, Ore. — Just six months of yoga significantly reduces fatigue in people with multiple sclerosis, but it has no effect on alertness and cognitive function, says a new Oregon Health & Science University study.

The study, published June 8 in the journal Neurology, found that yoga is as good as a traditional aerobic exercise program in improving measures of fatigue, a common and potentially disabling symptom of MS. It was the first randomized, controlled trial of yoga in people with MS.

A parallel study by the same OHSU authors, presented in April at the 56th annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology, found that cognitive function does not improve among healthy seniors in a six-month yoga program or exercise class, but physical health and quality of life appear to be enhanced.

The MS study was not designed to determine the impact of yoga on the disease itself, said the study’s lead author, Barry Oken, M.D., professor of neurology and behavioral neuroscience in the OHSU School of Medicine. Rather, it was intended to determine the effect of yoga and aerobic exercise on cognitive function, fatigue, mood and quality of life among people with MS.

“There are some claims out there that yoga helps MS itself, that it can decrease the number of lesions” in the brain caused by MS, said Oken, director of the Oregon Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Neurological Disorders (ORCCAMIND) at OHSU. “I’m not sure that that’s not the case, because stress may have an impact on MS. But that was not what we were trying to show.”

Study co-author Dennis Bourdette, M.D., professor of neurology in the OHSU School of Medicine and director of the Multiple Sclerosis Center of Oregon, said yoga was studied because many people with MS already are using it and reporting benefits.

“We wanted to see whether or not it was beneficial when studied scientifically and how it compared with a type of exercise that physicians are more comfortable recommending — exercise on a stationary bicycle supervised by a physical therapist,” said Bourdette, chairman of the School of Medicine’s Department of Neurology and associate director of ORCCAMIND.

An earlier survey of nearly 2,000 MS patients in Oregon and southwest Washington found about 30 percent of respondents tried yoga. Of those, 57 percent reported it to be “very beneficial,” Bourdette noted. Indeed, many chapters of the National MS Society sponsor yoga programs.

“So it is used fairly commonly, and I believe with the publication of our results it will gain even more acceptance and use,” he said. The study “also clearly demonstrates that yoga postures can be modified for use among people with MS who have disabilities caused by their condition and that yoga can be done safely and effectively.”

The study examined 69 MS patients in three groups: one taking weekly Iyengar yoga classes along with home practice; another taking a weekly exercise class using a stationary bicycle along with home exercise; and a third group placed on a waiting list to serve as a control. Participants were monitored for attention, alertness, mood, anxiety, fatigue and overall quality of life.

The yoga classes were offered once a week for 90 minutes. Participants were taught up to 19 poses, each held for 10 seconds to 30 seconds with rest periods of 30 seconds to a minute. They also performed breathing exercises to promote concentration and relaxation, as well as progressive relaxation, visualization, and meditation techniques. And daily home practice was strongly encouraged.

The MS study’s aerobic exercise component was similar to the yoga intervention, with one class per week plus home exercise. It consisted of bicycling on recumbent or dual-action stationary bicycles, and each class began and ended with about five minutes of stretching. Participants were given exercise bikes to use at home and were encouraged to use them outside of the weekly class.

While the yoga and aerobic exercise programs produced no significant changes in alertness, attention or other measures of cognitive function in MS patients compared with the waiting-list group, the study found there were improvements in two fatigue measurement tests.

“We think they’re equally beneficial for symptoms of fatigue from MS,” Oken said of yoga and aerobic exercise.

The study cautioned that the reasons behind the reduction in MS fatigue symptoms are unclear. The socialization aspect of the yoga and exercise classes, as well as a placebo effect — simply telling participants that the exercise program was specifically designed to improve psychological well-being — could be credited.

Yoga is a type of so-called mind-body medicine that includes tai-chi, meditation, and dance, music and art therapy. It is a commonly practiced method involving behavioral, psychological, social and spiritual approaches to health, and it is centered around meditation, breathing and postures.

Of the active or hatha yoga techniques, Iyengar yoga is the most common type practiced in the United States. Participants assume a series of stationary positions that employ isometric contraction and relaxation of different muscle groups to create specific body alignments. There also is a relaxation component.

“I see it mostly as a kind of physical activity with a stress-reduction component and body awareness features,” Oken said of yoga. “It has this aspect of bringing your attention to the present moment. But it’s hard to know if that’s due to relaxation or getting your mind not to worry for a little bit.”

Whatever the workout method, exercise seems to help MS patients reduce fatigue symptoms, Bourdette said.
“This is true whether the regular exercise is yoga, swimming, using a stationary bicycle or any other physical activity,” he said. “Sometimes the effects are quite dramatic and other times less so. But everyone with MS who exercises regularly reports benefit.”

The parallel study on the effects of yoga and exercise on healthy seniors focused on 136 participants aged 65 to 85. It showed there were some improvements in physical measures, such as cardiovascular fitness, and quality-of-life measures, such as energy and fatigue.

There was no improvement in measures of cognitive function, however, compared with a waiting-list control group.

“I was hoping to show some cognitive benefit, but the main benefit was a decrease in fatigue and higher energy levels,” Oken explained. “I think those relative benefits are only going to be seen over quite a long period of time. In healthy people, it’s probably going to be a fairly subtle effect.”

Both studies were funded by the National Institutes of Health.


Relaxation done in the chair.

Adaptive Chair Yoga for MS at Wesley United Methodist Church, 3515 Helena Avenue, Nederland, Texas 77627. Sponsored by the National MS Society, free for attendees and their support people. 10 a.m. to 11:00 a.m., Thursdays.

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Adaptive Yoga for those with
Multiple Sclerosis
Instructor Gail Pickens-Barger is a member of the International Association of Yoga Therapists and the Yoga Alliance, and is sponsored by the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.
She is certified at the 200-hour & 500-hour experience registered yoga teacher level and specializes
in Adaptive Yoga for Multiple Sclerosis.
For more information, contact Gail Pickens-Barger at 409-727-3177 or gaileee@yahoo.com .
“The only authentic yoga is the one that works for each person according to circumstances and needs, and there are many possibilities.” T.K.V. Desikachar

1 comments:

B. Burleson said…
Great article! I wish Yoga did enhance cognitive ability. Betty Burleson
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Top Seven Courses for Getting Your Yoga Classes Online


Top SEVENNow Eight! Whoops NINE Courses – Wow!

Gail's top 6 courses to get your Yoga Classes Online!
Gail’s top 7 …. now 8 and now  9!  courses to get your Yoga Classes Online!

With the Social Distancing to help with our current world’s crisis, Yoga teachers, movement teachers have been scrambling to figure out how to keep their yoga students, classes, and privates afloat.

Here’s my list of top six courses you should be looking at, to kick start you into getting your yoga classes online!  NEW Course added to the list from SequenceWiz!

1. Suzanne Dulin’s Course – “How to Rapidly Move Your Yoga Teaching Online – Using Zoom Video conferencing” – $7
gabb.co

2. Course: How to Share Your Yoga Teaching on Video with Sherry Zak Morris from Yoga Vista Academy – https://yogavistaacademy.com/product/course-how-to-share-your-yoga-teaching-on-video-with-sherry-zak-morris/Price lowered from 29.99 to 9.99

3. This one has excellent written tutorialsNEWTeaching Yoga Online: Resources, Support and Love for Teaching During a Global Pandemic March 23, 2020 by Francesca Cervero 

4. Teaching Yoga Online – Private Facebook Group.
https://www.facebook.com/groups/3314211098597060/

5. YogaUOnline A COVID-10 Planning and Resource Guide for Yoga Teachers and Yoga Studios – https://yogauonline.easywebinar.live/registration-11-12

6. Yoga Teacher Marketing Community – Digital Yoga Academy
https://www.facebook.com/groups/digitalyogaacademy/

7. How to teach Yoga Online – Yoga Sports Science presents for Yoga Alliance and British Wheel of Yoga
https://instituteofyogasportscience.mykajabi.com/YSS-online-yoga-teaching-resource

8. Body Positive Yoga – COVID-19 Resource Guide for Yoga Teachers & Movement Educators – https://bodypositiveyoga.com/covid19/

9. SequenceWiz.  Always has top notch advise.  How to Record  your own videos and offer them up for sale!

Come take a yoga class with me.

paypal.me/Yogawithgail/10

and you’ll get an online link to join my Gentle Yoga for Low Back Care Class!

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Salute to the Sun. Sun Salutations in Nederland Beaumont Texas. Yoga for Beginners

Salute to the Sun. Sun Salutations in Nederland Beaumont Texas. Yoga for Beginners



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The sequence of poses for the salute to the sun with additionally demonstrating Warrior I, Reverse Warrior and Side Angle Pose.  All done at the Beginner Level to help you toward your wellness goals.  Even on the chair, there are Advance, Intermediate and Beginning versions of poses.

Call Gail Pickens-Barger, Yoga Teacher.

If you don’t like my classes, or the fit isn’t just right, I will find you a class or teacher to help you on your path to your wellness goals.  409-727-3177.  Please leave a voice message, if I am unable to immediately get to your telephone call.  Thank you!